Bold Colors Blog

Stickin’ it to the libs, one day at a time

Posts Tagged ‘Carpe Diem’

Socialized medicine and prescription prices

Posted by Liberty on March 16, 2009

Canadians Pay 2X As Much For Generic Drugs

Take a look at Carpe Diem today.  If more people did, socialized medicine would never be imposed on the American people.

“The evidence suggests that generic retail drug prices are higher in Canada than they are in the United States because of various provincial and federal policies in Canada that are not found in the US.”

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Posted in Conservatism, Educate yourself, Health care, International news, Liberalism, Obama, Redistribution of wealth, Socialist economics, Socialized medicine | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Seize the perspective

Posted by Liberty on February 17, 2009

From Carpe Diem today:

Early 1980s vs. Now

Here’s a bit of an antidote for my last post about the plummeting stock markets.  It’s important to remember that, while our economy is bad, it certainly has been worse.  Some of us haven’t been around long enough to remember the last severe recession firsthand, so these statistics bear repeating.  In the early 80’s, America was still recovering from the failed presidency of Jimmy Carter.  How about 18.5% interest on your 30 year fixed mortgage?  It really was that bad in 1981.  14.8% inflation in 1980?  And 10.8% unemployment in 1982?  I’m not saying that we’re not headed there under Obama’s socialist policies but for the time being at least, it could be worse.

Posted in Liberalism, Obama, Socialist economics | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

From Carpe Diem: Analysis of Wal-Mart from the inside

Posted by Liberty on February 9, 2009

Poster Child for Enlightened Capitalism: Wal-Mart’s Not The Enemy, But Best Friend We Could Ask For

Professor Perry has excerpts posted from an article by Charles Platt.  He’s a former senior writer for Wired Magazine who, out of curiosity, took an entry level position at Wal-Mart.  He’s been blogging about his experience and has some good observations.

“Some people, usually community activists, loath Wal-Mart. Others, like the family of four struggling to make ends meet, are in love with the chain. I, meanwhile, am in awe of it.


The company is rebuked and reviled by anyone claiming a social conscience, and is lambasted by legislators as if its bad behavior places it somewhere between investment bankers and the Taliban.

Considering this is a company that is helping families ride out the economic downturn, which is providing jobs and stimulus while Congress bickers, which had sales growth of 2% this last quarter while other companies struggled, you have to wonder why. At least, I wondered why. And in that spirit of curiosity, I applied for an entry-level position at my local Wal-Mart.”
And:

“Coworkers assured me that the nearest Target paid its hourly full-timers less than Wal-Mart, while fast-food franchises were at the bottom of everyone’s list.


I found myself reaching an inescapable conclusion. Low wages are not a Wal-Mart problem. They are an industry-wide problem, afflicting all unskilled entry-level jobs, and the reason should be obvious. In our free-enterprise system, employees are valued largely in terms of what they can do. This is why teenagers fresh out of high school often go to vocational training institutes to become auto mechanics or electricians. They understand a basic principle that seems to elude social commentators, politicians and union organizers. If you want better pay, you need to learn skills that are in demand.

The blunt tools of legislation or union power can force a corporation to pay higher wages, but if employees don’t create an equal amount of additional value, there’s no net gain. All other factors remaining equal, the store will have to charge higher prices for its merchandise, and its competitive position will suffer.
This is Economics 101, but no one wants to believe it, because it tells us that a legislative or unionized quick-fix is not going to work in the long term. If you want people to be wealthier, they have to create additional wealth.
To my mind, the real scandal is not that a large corporation doesn’t pay people more. The scandal is that so many people have so little economic value. Despite (or because of) a free public school system, millions of teenagers enter the work force without marketable skills. So why would anyone expect them to be well paid?”
It’s a pretty interesting article.  I’ve always wondered what it would be like doing one of those under-cover, on-the-inside type of investigations.  Do you suppose I could masquerade as a lib?

Posted in Conservatism, Educate yourself | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

A good point from Carpe Diem–why target these sectors for “stimulus?”

Posted by Liberty on January 30, 2009

$646,214 Per Government Job

“House Democrats propose to spend $550 billion of their two-year, $825 billion ‘stimulus bill’ (the rest of it being tax cuts). Most of the spending is unlikely to be timely or temporary. Strangely, most of it is targeted toward sectors of the economy where unemployment is the lowest.

The December unemployment rate was only 2.3% for government workers and 3.8% in education and health. Unemployment rates in manufacturing and construction, by contrast, were 8.3% and 15.2% respectively. Yet 39% of the $550 billion in the bill would go to state and local governments. Another 17.3% would go to health and education — sectors where relatively secure government jobs are also prevalent.”

As a Conservative, I have no illusions about what this stimulus bill is composed of and why it is being implemented.  But I have to wonder why the average person doesn’t grasp what a sham it is.  I guess because they don’t talk about this kind of thing on American Idol.

Professor Perry’s post has a graph illustrating unemployment by market sector and also a link to the original article by Alan Reynolds at the Cato Institute.

Posted in Bureaucratic ineptitude, Just plain dishonest, Liberalism, Redistribution of wealth, Socialist economics, Stupid legislation | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Your daily dose of perspective

Posted by Liberty on January 24, 2009

This comes to us courtesy of Dr. Mark Perry of Carpe Diem.  If you haven’t looked at Carpe Diem yet, I couldn’t recommend it more highly. 

Time Magazine Cover Story: Why We’re So Gloomy

I have to admit that the two editorials by Dick Morris did leave me gloomy.  So, when I ran across this posting, I had to link to it.  Here’s a quick quote:

“Well, why are Americans so gloomy, fearful and even panicked about the current economic slump?

In one of history’s most painful paradoxes, U.S. consumers seem suddenly disillusioned with the American Dream of rising prosperity even as capitalism and democracy have consigned the Soviet Union to history’s trash heap. Hard times are forcing some people to turn their back on the American Dream.”

The question is, which economic slump is this article about?  I’m not going to spoil it for you–click on through to Professor Perry’s blog to find out.

Posted in Conservatism, Educate yourself, Main Stream Media | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Great perspective on Big Three bailout from Carpe Diem

Posted by Liberty on December 5, 2008

Professor Mark J. Perry of Carpe Diem blog fame has been consistently posting good info on the plight of the Big Three automakers.  He’s been especially highlighting the fact that union labor contracts have been a major reason that the Big Three are no longer competitive.  The MSM is handling the union with kid gloves, but that’s nothing new.  For instance, what do you know about the Job Bank?  The Job Bank is a union-backed program where laid-off autoworkers can collect up to 95% of their wages and benefits.  That’s right–the Big Three have been paying union workers, even when they’re not working.  Hmm…have Honda or Toyota been hamstrung by this kind of program?  The answer is no, because they employ non-union workers and consequently haven’t had the UAW gun to their heads.  Read Professor Perry’s brilliant post: Cost of Jobs Bank 2005-2008: $4,200,000,000.

Posted in Main Stream Media, Union Thuggery | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »